Capacity Building

 To download the Plan in full, scroll down.

The HR/IHL Secretariat’s main objectives are to: empower partner organisations and improve their ability to participate more effectively in empowering right holders and duty bearers; advocate for change of behaviour of duty bearers; and ensure results-based improvement of their work on their specific mandates. The Secretariat will focus on both the comprehensive and generic aspects of capacity development in relation to systems, (the HR/IHL CSO) sector and individuals.  

The capacity development approach adopts a strategy by which operational management, generating public interest values and managing the external environment are the key pillars in guiding engagement with CSOs.

Capacity development activities with CSOs will identify “traditional” values that are consistent with developing relationships based on tolerance and mutual trust. CSOs could serve as the incubator for promoting such values. Capacity development activities build on these values to strengthen CSOs operational and individual management capabilities based on transparency, accountability, integrity and equity.

The Secretariat’s additional capacity development objectives include the following:

  1. Improving performance quality of CSO professional and administrative staff through providing them with tools and skills (where needed) in IHL, HRBA, UN mechanisms and international advocacy.
  2. Empowering CSO professionals with knowledge and skills in financial management, human resource management and project cycle management.
  3. Strengthening partnerships, networking and peer-to-peer learning among various CSOs and other members of civil society in order to ensure knowledge transfer and exchange of best practices.
  4. Improving existing systems or introducing new ones in order to ensure having a proper organizational structure where individuals can better provide quality services and play effective community roles.
  5. Supporting an environment of accountability in terms of measurement of tangible results and impact.
  6. Ensuring CSOs participation through the participatory application of needs assessment tools, and increasing their ability to identify their needs and manage required reforms.
  7. Enabling CSOs to become learning organizations that can reflect, and create refinements on their own.
  8. Capacity building interventions should be more structural and systematically framed, building upon a participatory capacity assessment approach.
  9. Linkages between capacity development and policy dialogue need to be highlighted and developed, providing indicators for monitoring progress and documenting changes in CSO organizational performance and behavior.
  10. The Secretariat should expand the capacity building measures to go beyond institutional capacity building to include capacity building on the content of the work (e.g. international HR law, international criminal law, HRBA, gender analysis, government budgeting, etc.).

In order to achieve its Capacity Building component objectives, the Secretariat conducted a Capacity Assessment (CA) Study of the human rights (HR) and international humanitarian law (IHL) sector. It also developed the Participatory Organizational Capacity Assessment Tool (POCAT) with nearly 100 human rights and IHL–related questions, thus allowing the Secretariat to examine all aspects of human rights based approach (HRBA) in CSO capacities and resources.

The main recommendations generated by CSOs upon the completion of the CA Study included the following: 

  1. Capacity building interventions should be more structural and systematically framed, building upon a participatory capacity assessment approach.
  2. Linkages between capacity development and policy dialogue need to be highlighted and developed, providing indicators for monitoring progress and documenting changes in CSO organizational performance and behavior.
  3. The Secretariat should expand the capacity building measures to go beyond institutional capacity building to include capacity building on the content of the work (e.g. international HR law, international criminal law, HRBA, gender analysis, government budgeting, etc.).

This was followed by conducting the POCAT, which assisted CSOs in identifying their capacity gaps and institutional weaknesses. The Secretariat administered the POCAT with each potential core funding applicant CSO, during the proposal development process. After the application of the POCAT, CSOs were able to identify the steps needed to fill in gaps and overcome challenges faced. The application of the tool provided baseline data and will be applied again to provide at the end of the grant (post-data) to measure improvement in terms of institutional capacity and business practices. At the same time, the window will be open to individual CSOs to use the POCAT as a self-assessment tool on a yearly basis. The POCAT resulted in generating a comprehensive report for each CSO presenting all aspects of capacity building needs and interventions required to enhance the CSO capacity and performance. Each CSO was able to highlight the priorities and reflect these in a Capacity Development Plan (CDP) to be implemented during the life of its grant.

 The results of the POCAT and direction provided by the CA study guided the Secretariat’s Capacity Building Plan (CBP) and will guide the peer learning and sharing activities of the Secretariat for years to come.

Full text of the Capacity Building Plan is available here.

 

 

Ramallah
Ras Al-Tahouneh ST, near Al-Muqata'a
Al-Bireh, Palestine
Phone: 02 297 4563/4
Fax: 02 297 4565
Email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Gaza
Tomouh Building (Jawwal), Al-Jala'
Gaza City, Palestine
Phone: 08 288 3115
Fax: 08 288 3114
Email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Disclaimer
The views expressed in this publication
are those of the author(s) and do not
necessarily reflect the views of the
Secretariat, Niras NATURA AB, Birzeit University,
or the donor governments.